eMix Radiology Cloud Computing Expands

Radiology is in a transition phase when it comes to sharing radiology data between various users. We’re moving from sharing files on old technology such as CDs to sharing images and reports using cloud computing– that is, sharing the files in electronic form using a hosted service on the Internet.

During this transition time, however, hospitals are still getting a lot of radiology files on CDs. How they move those files to hospitals and doctors without the expense, hassle, and time delays of mail or shipping? eMix – created by DR Systems, a client of Dowling & Dennis PR — has found a way.

eMix (“electronic medical information exchange,” http://www.emix.com) is the leading cloud-based system for sharing radiology images and reports. It has just added a terrific new feature: The ability to import data from CDs.

Now when hospitals get radiology data on CDs, they can import it into eMix. From there, the files can be read, moved to another hospital IT system such as a PACS or radiology information system, or sent via the cloud to another hospital or doctor.

The process is as simple as sending email. The new eMix feature enables them editing of the imported exam’s medical record number (MRN) so it corresponds to their own numbering system and also create a radiology order session number.

This new feature also allows users to import data into eMix from a USB thumb drive, external hard disk, and/or other digital storage device. That makes eMix the ideal bridge into the future, from the technology mix we have today.

Cloud Brightens Radiology

While healthcare reform will make immediate changes in the medical landscape, one aspect of care is still evolving only slowly. The problem: Most patient information remains on paper, stored away in files. Even most electronic patient information remains in silos – and is often not readily accessible, with appropriate privacy safeguards, to caregivers who need it.

Radiology, which generates most of the information in an electronic health record, has traditionally relied on proprietary picture archiving and communication systems (PACS) to store and transmit patient info. While PACS will remain central to radiology, much of this information will eventually migrate to the “cloud” of digitalized info that can be uploaded and downloaded remotely – again with privacy safeguards – to and from websites and servers.

This month has seen the official commercial launch of eMix (“electronic medical information exchange,” http://www.emix.com). It’s the leading new application for sharing radiology images and reports, but it certainly won’t be the only one.

eMix solves a problem that has vexed medical imaging: how to securely share radiology data between proprietary PACS and other IT systems that don’t “talk to each other.” The solution: Use cloud computing to make data sharing as easy as sending and receiving email. The service was created by DR Systems, a client of Dowling & Dennis PR.

As RHIO’s (regional health information organizations) evolve into HIE’s (health information exchanges), they’ll have to figure out how HIE members can easily and inexpensively share patient information. Given how hard this is to do institution-by-institution or state-by-state, it seems inevitable that HIE’s will look to the cloud for the solution.

PR Spending Rises, Even in Recession

The respected Economist magazine reports that even in this horrible recession, corporate spending on public relations is on the rise.

“According to data from Veronis Suhler Stevenson (VSS), a private-equity firm, spending on public relations in America grew by more than 4% in 2008 and nearly 3% in 2009 to $3.7 billion,” the magazine writes. “That is remarkable when compared with other forms of marketing. Spending on advertising contracted by nearly 3% in 2008 and by 8% in the past year. PR’s position looks even rosier when word-of-mouth marketing, which includes services that PR firms often manage, such as outreach to bloggers, is included. Spending on such
things increased by more than 10% in 2009.”

Why the rise?

Part of the answer is that PR is so cost-effective, at a time when
everyone is carefully counting dollars. In healthcare, ad dollars have been shrinking because advertising is very costly and far less credible than media coverage and other awareness-building achievements generated by good PR. Moreover, the increasing need for businesses to be involved in social media — where PR shines in delivering the message — also drives investments.

eMix Radiology Sharing Service Debuts

eMix, a groundbreaking new technology for sharing radiology images and reports, has made its debut in Montana health facilities. A number of other health systems are also lined up to use eMix (“electronic medical information exchange”).

For “Healthcare IT” magazine’s coverage of this exciting new service, see http://tinyurl.com/yfo4of7.

The first three institutions to use eMix were Great Falls Clinic,
Kalispell Regional Medical Center, and St. Luke Community Healthcare. The service was created by DR Systems, a client of Dowling & Dennis PR.

eMix solves a problem that has vexed medical imaging: how to securely share radiology data between proprietary PACS and other IT systems that don’t “talk to each other.” The solution: eMix uses “cloud computing” to make data sharing as easy as sending and receiving email.

The three Montana facilities are involved in a grassroots organization called Image Movement of Montana (IMOM), which formed to address the difficulty of sharing radiology images and reports. IMOM approached numerous vendors for possible solutions. DR System’s eMix was by far the most attractive option because it was simple, affordable, and required no new hardware or software.

For more information, visit http://www.emix.com.